Thursday, 6 March 2008

Part whole

I did a part whole activity with my class on a jandal today and it went quite well! I have posted on the wiki under stanhope road school and included is a pdf template with the wee chart that we were shown yesterday :)

1 comment:

artichoke said...

Thanks for this -

I just love the photos of student work on the wiki - and a jandal is a great choice for introducing part-whole analysis (SOLO relational thinking processes)

You are off to a great start in teaching the leaders of tomorrow

I was interested in the different names for jandals on wikipedia - I always think of them as flip flops the name we used where I grew up in the Middle East

This sandal is known by different names in different localities:

* In Argentina, they are known as ojotas.
* In Australian English these are known as thongs.
* In Brazil they are known as sandálias or chinelos.
* In Canada they are known as flip flops although thongs is a very common term.
* In Chile they are known as sandalias or chalas (second one is informal).
* In China, they are known as traditional Chinese: 拖鞋; pinyin: tuōxié (referring to shoes which drag to the floor).
* In Croatia, they are known as japanke, meaning Japanese (slippers is implied).
* In Czech republic and in Slovakia they are known as žabky (translated means frogs)
* In Denmark they are known as klip-klappere.
* In El Salvador, they are known as yinas and chancletas.
* In Estonia they are known as plätud.
* In Flanders, they are known as teensletsen
* In French they are known as tongs or claquettes, but in Quebec they are known as gougounes.
* In Germany they are known as Flip Flops
* In Francophone Africa they are known as tapettes.
* In Ghana they are known as chale wotes
* In Gibraltar they are known as shanklas (from Spanish chanclas)
* In Greece they are known as sagionares (from the famous Japanese farewell Sayōnara)
* In Guam they are known as "zorries" (from Japanese zōri 草履).
* In Hawaii, sandals are known as slippers or slippas. Flip-flops specifically are known as jap-slaps [sic] .
* In Hungary they are known as vietnami papucs (translates as Vietnamese slipper)
* In India, similar sandals are known as Hawaii Chappals. Some kinds of chappals are made of leather, and some have a strap over the big toe.
* In Indonesia, they are known as "sandal jepit".
* In Israel, they are known as כפכפי-אצבע (transliterated into English: kafkafey-etsba, meaning toe slippers)
* In Italy, they are called infradito , literally inter-toes.
* In Jamaica, they are known as slippers or sandals.
* In Japan, they are known as ビーサン ("biisan" derived from the English "beach sandals")
* In Malawi they are known as "ma slippas" or "ma pata pata".
* In Malaysia, they are known as selipar jepun, literally "Japanese slippers"
* In Malta, they are known as "karkur".
* In Mexico, they are called "chanclas."
* In Myanmar they are known as "Pha Nut".
* In The Netherlands, they are known as teenslippers
* In New Zealand English they are known generically as jandals (Japanese sANDALS).
* In Pakistan they are known as chappals, qainchey chappals or Hawaiian chappals.
* In Panama they are known as chancletas, chinelas, or chancletas "rock-'n-roll".
* In Philippines they are known as tsinelas and slippers.
* In Poland they are known as japonki which literally translated means "Japanese women", but its real meaning is simply "The Japanese"
* In Romania they are known as şlapi.
* In Russia they are known as vyetnamki meaning "Vietnamese", or slancy - by the name of a town (Slancy), where they have been made since Soviet era.
* In South Africa they are known as slops.
* In Spain they are known as chancletas or chanclas.
* In Sri Lanka they are known as slippers or Bata, after the name of the most popular flip-flop brand in the country Bata.
* In Trinidad & Tobago they are known as slippers
* In Turkey they are known as tokyo, şipidik, parmak-arası.
* In Uganda they are known as makambos
* In the United States, they are generally known as sandals, flip-flops, go-aheads, thongs, and zōri.
* In the United States Army, they are known as shower-shoes
* In the United States Navy, they are known as go-slowers (a play on "go-fasters", the Navy term for running shoes)
* In Uruguay, they are known as chancletas
* In Wales, they are known as: flop-flip
* In Venezuela, they are known as: cholas
* In Saint Lucia, they are known as: Katapol